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Editors BC Is Going Live!

Written by Roma Ilnyckyj; copy edited by Maggie Clark

As the executive of Editors BC, we know that we have members all across BC, as well as in Yukon, and we know that this geographic range means that a lot of our members don’t get the same access to Editors BC benefits as those who live in or near Vancouver. To address this gap, we have some initiatives in the works. For a start, we’re making our monthly meetings accessible to all our members through live streaming.

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Event Review: Editors BC’s Seminar, “Getting the Message Across: Clear Writing Tips”

Written by Joanna Vandervlugt; copy edited by Maggie Clark

On Saturday, February 23, 2019, I attended Frances Peck’s seminar for Editors BC, “Getting the Message Across: Clear Writing Tips.”

Despite coming over from Vancouver Island, I found this seminar’s location convenient. The seminar was set up in Vancouver at the BCIT Downtown Campus. This place was an easily accessible one for those who were familiar with the SkyTrain routes like myself.

After reaching my destination from the SkyTrain and settling in, I got to know a bit more about the other class participants. We introduced ourselves, and it seemed that the seminar participants ranged from proofreaders, editors, writers, and academics. Many commented that they were a fan of Frances, and I soon learned why.

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Meet the Instructor: Jessica Somers

Written by Carl Rosenberg; copy edited by Maggie Clark

Photo of Jessica Somers with long black hair smiling at the camera while dressed in a jean jacket, low-neck black top, and a number of black necklaces.

On Saturday, September 29, Editors BC presents Jessica Somers’ seminar on tax and finance for freelancers. This six-hour seminar will give an introduction to basic tax and finance issues for freelancers, including GST/HST registration, bookkeeping and record retention, and building financial stability without a salary. For editors new to freelancing, the seminar covers the basic essentials. And veteran freelancers will learn tips and tricks, have their questions answered, and clarify the details. See the registration page for more details.

Jessica Somers is a chartered professional accountant (CPA, CGA) with over 10 years of experience advising freelancers, entrepreneurs, and small businesses in Vancouver on tax, accounting, and business process. She is the founder of Cordova Street Consulting, a new firm in Gastown, which focuses on knowledge sharing, outreach, and taking the stress and mystery out of tax. Jessica is a facilitator and session leader at the CPA Western School of Business, where she teaches the next generation of Vancouver accountants and tax advisors.

Carl Rosenberg, a volunteer on Editors BC’s communications and social media committee, spoke to Jessica about her work on tax and finance issues for freelancers.

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Seven Mistakes Many First-Time Editors Make (and How to Avoid Them)

Written by Lindsay Vermeulen; copy edited by Maggie Clark

So, you’ve decided to become an editor.

If you’re quitting a job to go freelance, the prospect of changing careers can be intimidating. And yes, there are plenty of opportunities to mess up. Never fear! They are all part of the learning process, and they will all make you better at what you do. But you don’t have to make all the mistakes on your own, because I’ve already made a bunch of them (or known others who have made them). Read on to learn how to avoid seven mistakes many new editors make.

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Event Review: An Introduction to Editing for Accessibility

Written by Ritu Guglani; copy edited by Maggie Clark

Iva Cheung, a certified editing professional and member of Editors BC, spoke to a room full of eager participants at Editors BC’s January 2018 meeting. Her presentation topic was editing for accessibility. While editors live in a world of nuances and judgment calls, Iva re-affirmed that it is always a good idea to use the basic principles of plain language to remove communication barriers for people with disabilities.

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Meet the Instructor: Jennifer Landels

Written by Carl Rosenberg; copy edited by Maggie Clark

This photo depicts Jennifer Landels in her swordplay outfit with both hands holding onto the sword, making it point downwards.

On Saturday, January 27, Editors BC presents a seminar, “From Slush Pile to Newsstand: Workshopping the Magazine Workflow,” by long-time editor Jennifer Landels. This full-day seminar will walk participants through the typical workflow of a literary magazine, giving an overview of the production flow and various editorial stages, and giving participants hands-on experience in each of them. This seminar will be particularly helpful for editors looking to improve their workflow processes, change roles within their publications, or expand their publishing expertise.

Jennifer is a founding editor and managing editor of Pulp Literature Press. Prior to starting the press, she worked as a freelance editor, writer, and designer.

Carl Rosenberg, a volunteer on Editors BC’s communications and social media committee, spoke to Jennifer about her work and advice on magazine editing.

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Event Review: SEO for Editors by Lisa Manfield

Written by Wendy Barron; copy edited by Maggie Clark

Whether you do business on the Web or edit for clients who do, understanding search engine optimization—SEO—is crucial to creating compelling web content and helping people find that content. On September 30, Lisa Manfield shared the principles of good SEO with 15 editors who were eager to improve the Google juice of their own websites and their clients’ websites.

SEO changes constantly, Lisa notes, and Google (which has the largest market share in the Internet search game) never reveals how its algorithms work or which elements of SEO are weighted more heavily than others. But the SEO practices that worked in the early days, such as keyword stuffing of metadata and content farming, can now reduce a web page’s ranking rather than improve it.

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