Book Review: Marketing Your Editing & Proofreading Business

Written by Amy Haagsma; copy edited by Meagan Kus

Review of “Marketing Your Editing & Proofreading Business” by Louise Harnby, in association with The Publishing Training Centre.

Louise Harnby Marketing

Last week we reviewed Louise Harnby’s book Business Planning for Editorial Freelancers, a how-to guide for preparing a business plan. Harnby included a lot of great information on marketing, but she has also covered the topic in more detail in her more recent book, Marketing Your Editing & Proofreading Business.

Harnby touts this as “a book for editorial business owners, by an editorial business owner.” She promises that it is not a marketing textbook and that she’s done her best to avoid using jargon; rather, she’s tried to give editorial professionals real advice in the same manner she would in a face-to-face conversation.

Even the introduction is packed full of useful information, and the first item Harnby tackles is dispelling the notion that editors and proofreaders are not marketers. Everyone, she says, is a marketer, and having a marketing strategy is essential. After you’ve invested time and money in setting up your business, marketing is the next step to help you find clients and sell your services. Being good at what you do is not enough; you need to be found in order to be successful. Once you have built up your client base, regular marketing helps you stay in the minds of your clients.

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Book Review: Business Planning for Editorial Freelancers

Written by Amy Haagsma; copy edited by Michael Ferreira

Review of “Business Planning for Editorial Freelancers” by Louise Harnby, in association with The Publishing Training Centre.

Louise Harnby Business Planning…As a new editor, I have set out to learn as much as I can about editing, both the business and the craft. Among the many fantastic resources I’ve discovered are Louise Harnby’s blog, The Proofreader’s Parlour, and books, Business Planning for Editorial Freelancers and Marketing Your Editing & Proofreading Business.

Harnby is a UK-based proofreader and an advanced member of the Society for Editors and Proofreaders. She has more than 20 years’ experience in publishing and started her own business in 2005.

Business Planning for Editorial Freelancers is written with the complete beginner in mind and assumes no prior editorial experience. It aims to cover everything a new editorial freelancer would need to know, from education and training to finding clients and growing your business.

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Event Review: Beyond Track Changes

Written by Amy Haagsma; copy edited by Meagan Kus

Review of seminar Beyond Track Changes with Iva Cheung, Grace Yaginuma, and Ann-Marie Metten (offered by EAC-BC on November 29, 2014).

For most editors, the majority of our onscreen editing is done using Microsoft Word. For many of us, it’s a love–hate relationship: we’ve learned to live with (or work around) the “features” we dislike.

EAC-BC’s November seminar, Beyond Track Changes, promised to help us get the most out of Word, tame its most irritating features, and work more efficiently, as well as to demystify advanced features like wildcard searches and macros. Naturally, the seminar sold out quickly!

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Event Review: Communication Convergence

by Amy Haagsma

Review of Communication Convergence (co-organized by EAC-BC; held on October 5, 2014)

“Communication convergence: The tendency for different communication fields over time to apply a common range of methods.” – Dr. Neil James

On October 5, EAC-BC participated in a new event, Communication Convergence, focused on clear communication and the importance of using plain language. It was held in conjunction with and in celebration of International Plain Language Day, which is recognized annually on October 13. This year’s theme was “Working Together to Promote Clear Communication.” With this in mind, Communication Convergence aimed to bring together different organizations with a focus on communication.

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EAC-BC at Word Vancouver 2014

Written by Alexandra Bogdanovic; copy edited by Tanya Procyshyn

On Sunday, September 28, EAC-BC participated in Word Vancouver, a free reading and writing festival. It is also part of Cultural Days, a national celebration of the arts. The festival began on Wednesday, September 24, and was held over the course of five days. Events took place at several venues, including The Paper Hound, Banyen Books & Sound, The Cottage Bistro, Christianne’s Lyceum, Historic Joy Kogawa House, and SFU Harbour Centre. The main event was held on Sunday, September 28, at the Vancouver Public Library’s Central Branch.

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Event review: Hitting-the-books wine and cheese

by Amy Haagsma

Recap of EAC-BC’s branch meeting on September 17, 2014

EAC-BC held its 2014­–2015 season opener on September 17, 2014. Before getting down to business, we drank wine, ate cheese, and reconnected with our peers after a summer away.

To kick off the evening, Roma Ilnyckyj, our new Programs chair, introduced the 2014–2015 executive and announced volunteer opportunities with the branch. We are particularly in need of two volunteers to organize refreshments for our branch meetings (update: Frances Peck and Connie Behl have graciously stepped forward to take on this role). The Communications and Social Media committee is always looking for volunteers as well, which allows us to participate in events like Word Vancouver and Communication Convergence. Writers and editors are also needed for West Coast Editor. Please contact Shelagh Jamieson for the Communications and Social Media committee, and Amy Haagsma regarding West Coast Editor.
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Event Review: Battling Woes & Busting Myths

 by Amy Haagsma; review of seminar Usage Woes and Myths with Frances Peck (offered by EAC-BC on April 12, 2014)

Although an EAC member for almost a year, I hadn’t yet had the opportunity to attend one of EAC-BC’s professional development seminars. Usage Woes and Myths with Frances Peck caught my attention right away, as I had learned a lot from Frances through her courses at Simon Fraser University. It initially occurred to me that I might not need the seminar, as I thought I had a pretty good grasp of word usage, but as I started reading the description I realized how wrong I was.

“You’ve sorted out imply and infer.” (Check!)

“You know it’s not all right to use alright.” (It’s not?)

“But what about more troublesome usage points, like the difference between may and might?” (Hmm. I may [or is it might?] need to take this seminar after all.)

“Or such commonly misused words as dilemma and fulsome?” (What’s a fulsome?)

“Is it true that you should always change though to although, till to until?” (I definitely need to take this seminar. Sign me up!)

“Is impact now officially a verb?” (Stop the madness!)
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Technically Editing

by Amy Haagsma

Editing offers a wide variety of career avenues. And as technology makes it easier to distribute content, the demand for well-written, professionally-edited material continues to rise. Enter technical editing: a growing specialty that brings with it a diverse and rewarding career path.

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Event review: International editing

by Amy Haagsma

Review of panel discussion on international editing at the EAC-BC branch meeting on April 16, 2014.

One very appealing aspect of a career in editing is its flexibility. Work can be done from almost anywhere and planned around a variety of schedules. After attending EAC-BC’s April meeting on international editing, I realized that another benefit is how vast your potential client base can be. Even if you have a niche specialty, a global market makes it easier to find clients who need your services.

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From Proofreading to Plain Language: A Review of SFU’s Editing Program

by Amy Haagsma

In September 2012, I attended an information session at SFU on the Continuing Studies Writing and Communications program. When the presenters spoke about career options in editing, I realized that I had been an “undercover editor” for quite some time. Although my title did not include the word “editor,” this described a large part of what I did at work. I decided to take a few courses in the Editing Certificate program to learn more about the field and improve my skills.

Whether you’re new to editing or a seasoned pro, the program has something for everyone. SFU offers a variety of editing courses and the only editing certificate program in Western Canada. The courses can help you learn the craft, formalize your qualifications, brush up in certain areas, or expand your service offering. The material also forms a good basis for EAC certification.

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